I’m Not Frightened, I’m Determined

first_imgAward-wining Hip Co musical artist Takun J says he has been harrassed several times since releasing his latest hit singles, “Justice” and “They Lie To Us.” Althought both songs that have been well received by the public, “I’m sometimes harassed by security officers when driving and it is getting personal. I’m not frightened, and I am determined to continue informing the public about what is going on,” he added.“Music is my life. Through music, the voice of the people can be heard,” he stated. “With music, political and social change can take place in the life of any people.”Takun J said the people are tired of the many lies that there would be better living conditions; and so they need somebody to speak out for them.“ I decided to speak for them so their voices can be heard. I’m frowned upon by the authorities because the songs speak the truth,” he said with smile.The artist, also known as the King of Hip Co, noted that his inspiration for this song, “They Lie to Us,” came in the midst of the Ebola crisis, after he observed that “people where dying at the early stages without care, while authorities corrupted the funds they receiving. “They lied to us. I am speaking not only about this government alone, but also past governments that have cheated and mistreated us.”“They Lie To Us”, the current hottest single in Liberia, reflects the people’s frustration with the powers in government, as access to opportunities and better economic conditions continue to decline for the majority of people.In 2007, after releasing the hit controversial single, “Policeman,” a song that exposed police corruption, police officers arrested and jailed Takun J twice. The song “Justice” revealed an ordeal with Montserrado District 5 Representative Edwin M. Snowe in 2014, when an minor car accident between the two turned into a physical assault allegedly penetrated by the lawmaker. Takun J says he wrote the song because all legal means pursued to obtain justice for his grievance against the lawmaker failed.“It is not government alone that is practicing corruption on the daily basis. We ourselves are doing it also. I don’t think that corruption helps anybody; and if we continue this without a change, the worst may happen to Liberia,” he warned.He disclosed that because of lack of honesty among the authorities, the ordinary citizens languish in poverty. The only good thing that Liberia can boast of now is peace, whereas the citizens sleep with hunger and misery every day. “We Liberians need to be careful in the coming election or else it will be old wine in new bottle. “My way of life is that if I wrong you, let me be punished for it; it is now time that corrupt officials are disciplined,” he warned.Takun J stressed that if nothing is done about corruption, the next generation will suffer more and these are the messages the songs are preaching.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

400 Bigfoot believers gather

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Outlandish theories about the origin of Bigfoot abound, including that it might be an extraterrestrial. Many believe that a towering, apelike creature descended from a prehistoric 9- to 10-foot-tall gorilla called a Gigantopithecus, and that it now inhabits North American forests. Hoaxes have been a large part of the making of the Bigfoot legend. California construction company owner Ray L. Wallace donned 16-inch wooden feet to create tracks in mud in 1958, and it led to a front-page story in a local paper that coined the term “Bigfoot.” But there have been more than 2,550 seemingly credible Bigfoot sightings reported in North America in the past century, according to Christopher L. Murphy’s 2004 book “Meet the Sasquatch.” Colyer and others estimate that about 2,000 are in North America today, reclusive nocturnal animals living in thickly wooded areas with waterways, eating meat and plants and making nests out of trees and brush. JEFFERSON, Texas – Next to a lifelike replica of a giant ape head, the believers milled around tables Saturday covered with casts of large footprints, books about nature’s mysteries and T-shirts proclaiming “Bigfoot: Often Imitated, Never Invalidated.” While they can have a sense of humor about it, the search for the legendary Sasquatch is no joke for many of the nearly 400 people who came here to discuss the latest sightings and tracking techniques at the Texas Bigfoot Conference. “It’s not a matter of believing, like faith, when you believe in something you can’t see,” said Daryl G. Colyer, a Lorena businessman who has investigated hundreds of reported Bigfoot sightings in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana. “It’s a flesh-and-blood animal that just has not been discovered yet. And I think we’re getting closer and closer and closer,” Colyer said. last_img read more