World Cup Live Stream Watch France vs South Korea and the opening

first_imgBBC iPlayer | iOSBBC iPlayer | AndroidBBC iPlayer | Web We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor France vs South Korea Live Stream: Watch the match online for freeTo watch France vs South Korea online, all you need to do is fire up BBC iPlayer, which doesn’t cost a penny if you’ve got a valid UK TV license.Related: What is VAR?There are iPlayer apps available for virtually every modern platform and device. Below are some of the most popular to help you on your way. Hotspot Shield VPNFrom £2.99/month & 45 day money-back guaranteeVPN for streaming, browsing, social media, gaming, and file sharing.Offers security, privacy and the ability to stream your favourite TV from abroadSave 77%|£107.64/ 3 yearsView Deal£107.64/ 3 years|Save 77% The World Cup 2019 is finally here, and this month of football kicks off with favourites France testing their home advantage against South Korea. Then we’ve got an entire month of football to expect from just across the channel and there’s a lot to be excited about as just behind slight favourites France and the United States for the World Cup trophy, there’s England, ranked third in the world and looking likely at this early stage to bring a trophy home.It’ll also be the first time the women’s World Cup (which we’ll call the World Cup moving forwards because it’s 2019) has used VAR Argos TV DealsSamsung 55MU6120 55 Inch 4K UHD Smart TV with HDR | Now £499, save £50Grab this Samsung 4K Ultra HD HDR TV, perfect for the World Cup. Now selling for Argos’ lowest ever price.£499.00View dealcenter_img BBC have acquired the rights to the games in the UK and BBC Sport will have coverage of every single World Cup match across TV, radio, and their Red Button. The first match will be live on BBC One, live from Paris. If you’re hoping to wait until England play, that’s taking place on Sunday, also live on BBC One.Related: Amazon Spring Sale BargainsIt should be a great tournament, and while England’s mens team gave a decent account of themselves back in 2018, it’s great to go into a tournament with the expectation that we might actually win something.Of course, I’m a West Ham United fan, and as all West Ham United fans can tell you, hope is dangerous and often leads to bitter disappointment. Best World Cup TV DealsPhilips TV 55PUS6753 6753 55 Inch 4K Ultra HD A+ Smart LED TV 3 HDMILooking for an affordable 55-inch set that can also add a splash of colour to the match? Check no further than the Philips Ambilight TV, now going for a sure cheap price on AO’s eBay store.AO (via eBay)|Save £120|Now £429.00View DealNow £429.00|Save £120|AO (via eBay) This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.last_img read more

Google Home Offer Save £30 in the Currys Black Tag Sale

first_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. As an ecosystem, the more you put into Google Home, the more you get out. Powerful routines and integratiton with Google apps have created a situation where I wake up each day and blankly listen to my Google Home while it reels off my plans for the day, tells me how to dress (with a weather forecast) and when to leave for work (with commuting updates) before I even get out of bed. Related: Amazon Prime Day Smart Home DealsBut you don’t need to take my word for it. Our homes editor David Ludlow praised the Google Home’s smart design and easy set-up, saying: “Google Home is a powerful smart speaker, powered by the smartest voice assistant and a growing range of smart device support.” But still, even just buying one will save you £30, which is nice. This is the best price we’ve seen, shaving a tenner off of the £69 we saw them selling for on Black Friday last year, courtesy of Curry’s black tag sale. Want to stay up to date with Amazon Prime Day 2019? We’ve got you covered. For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase, so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs. Deals The Google Home smart speaker is now just £59, offering up savings of £30 for customers looking to grab a bargain and get involved in Google’s cracking Google Home ecosystem. My flat has a Google Home smart speaker in every room, and I feel comfortable recommending these whether you want to use it to control your entire smarthome or you just want to be able to ask Google to play Spotify for you and set alarms by voice. Google Home dealGoogle Home – WhiteGoogle’s classic smart speaker for a cracking price, what more do you need?currys|Save £30|£59.00View Deal£59.00|Save £30|currys Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. The savings here are great specifically because you’ll probably want to buy a couple, letting you outfit a small flat for just £118. Saving a third of the cost of every Google Home makes this deal better and better for each additional speaker you buy.  Google Home dealGoogle Home – WhiteGoogle’s classic smart speaker for a cracking price, what more do you need?currys|Save £30|£59.00View Deal£59.00|Save £30|currys We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

FaceApp Ageing Challenge No the Russians arent stealing all your photos

first_imgIn the last few days you’ve probably seen what loads of your friends and favourite celebrities will look like decades from now.Thanks to the ageing filter on FaceApp, which uses AI to project their appearance as a much older person, a new social media challenge has gone viral.However, amid the excitement, fears were raised that the application launched by a Russian developer 2 years ago, is harvesting users’ entire photo libraries (via The Verge).The concerns, which were raised when the app first shot to prominence and have returned with this week’s renewed notoriety, seem to centre on the Russia factor.While those who’ve looked into the matter have found no evidence the app is harvesting photos from the user library, it does take the photo in question and upload to the cloud for processing, rather than locally on the device. using a network traffic analyzer, I tried to replicate the thing people are talking about with FaceApp allegedly uploading your full camera roll to remote servers, but I did not see the reported activity occur.here is marlo stanfiekd with a beard though pic.twitter.com/6wy8cHLNuA— Will Strafach (@chronic) July 17, 2019This is something that a lot of apps do, but it appears FaceApp might be being picked on for the Russia connection. Perhaps suspicions of all things Russian have been heightened by millions of us smashing through Stranger Things 3 in the last couple of weeks?The developer denied the alleged harvesting and said it only takes the photos users specifically ask it to transform. On top of that the images don’t go back to Russia, the processing is carried out on servers in the US.Yaroslav Goncharov, the company’s CEO said: “FaceApp performs most of the photo processing in the cloud. We only upload a photo selected by a user for editing. We never transfer any other images from the phone to the cloud.”The firm also told TechCrunch that it accepts requests from users to remove the data from its services, but it is currently overloaded with requests to do so, so it may take a while. The process can be started by visiting Settings > Support > Report a bug and placing “privacy” in the subject line. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy.center_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links. Tell us what you think.last_img read more

EasyJet Says Electric 9Seat Jet Will Hit The Skies Next Year

first_imgMaiden flight of 9-seater expected in 2019.Budget British airline EasyJet, which engaged in the Los Angeles-based Wright Electric start-up, reports progress on the development of an all-electric airliner – “Progress has been made”.According to Flight Global’s article, next year Wright Electric will be able to perform the first flight of a nine-seat electric aircraft.There are few details on the project, but EasyJet hopes for 500 km (310 miles) of range and dreams to establish the first electric flyway between London and Amsterdam. The aircraft is to be designed by Darold Cummings, former Boeing and the US Department of Defense employee.Electric flight Source: Electric Vehicle News There are also some enigmatic mentions about the new novel motor, but regardless of motors, we hope the required battery progress is already in place to take the project seriously.“Wright Electric has applied for a patent of a “novel motor design” to power an “EasyJet-sized” electric airliner, says the airline, without providing detail of the architecture being proposed.”[The] development suggests that the transition towards an all-electric commercial passenger jet capable of flying passengers across EasyJet’s UK and European network is in sight,” it adds.”The ultimate goal is to develop 150-seat all-electric airplane with a 300 mile (nearly 500 km) range.On Wright Electric’s twitter we found that company forwarded solid-state battery news, which is probably where the battery hopes are directed.A 12MWh / yr solid state battery production line from @SolidPowerInc (bottom right) pic.twitter.com/6KhlRQsQdP— Simon Moores (@sdmoores) October 23, 2018 Bjorn Takes To The Skies In The Pipestrel Electric Airplane Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 2, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newscenter_img The Future Of Air Travel? Meet The 150-Seat Wright Electric Airplane Source: Flight Global NASA Electric X-57 Maxwell Airplane Debuts at AirVenture 2018last_img read more

Review GenZe 200 series electric bicycle is a well built and fun

first_imgSource: Charge Forward I’ve had a GenZe 200 series electric bicycle for about six months now. That’s given me a lot of time to get to know the e-bike inside and out, become accustomed to its technology, and see what makes this thing tick. And after all that time, I can give the GenZe e-bike two thumbs up! more…The post Review: GenZe 200 series electric bicycle is a well built and fun commuter bike appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Prior pulls no punches as Sussex close in on first win

first_imgNottinghamshire Add a blinding catch – a rarity in this match – from Carl Hopkinson to get rid of Mark Wagh and low bounce to end Adam Voges’ fightback, and Nottinghamshire were grateful for some sloppy bowling to make three figures. Earlier, Prior’s summer of plenty for Sussex if not England had continued when he passed fifty for the sixth time. On Tuesday, when six Sussex wickets fell before lunch, he scored a century, the second of the season, off 115 balls. It was chanceless other than for a minor mix-up that could have seen him run out.Yesterday he took three hours getting to fifty and twice needed the help of Nottinghamshire’s charitable fielders, who dropped six chances in the innings. The hardest was to Wood, which went in to and then out of the short leg’s hands off the full face of the bat.Prior was then on 34. Ten runs later Jefferson buried his head in his hands, but not for the last time, as Mushtaq Ahmed was also to be given a life. With Michael Yardy and Murray Goodwin put down on Wednesday and Luke Wright dropped before lunch, the Nottinghamshire slip cordon have cost their team dear.Yardy and Goodwin were gone pretty quickly yesterday, adding only 33 to the overnight score of 70 for two. Yardy drove a stinging caught-and-bowled chance back to Charlie Shreck and Goodwin failed to get his gloves out of the way of a delivery from Darren Pattinson which cut back. However Wright was the senior partner in a stand of 93 with Prior before, aiming to leg, he gave Jefferson a bat-pad chance that did stick.By then Prior had found the boundary seven times – the best, a cover drive off Pattinson to go to 44 – and was in sight of his half-century. The relief at passing it was marked with an outrageous cut for six, but it also signalled the beginning of the end with the final three Sussex wickets falling in four deliveries.Mushtaq flashed once too often, Lewry lost his off stump to Paul Franks, second ball, and Prior was last out, bowled for 64 – the second highest score of the game so far – playing very correctly at Graeme Swann. Topics Thu 22 May 2008 19.01 EDT Share via Email Sussex 277 & 259; Nottinghamshire 251 & 114-5 Share on Twitter Sussex First published on Thu 22 May 2008 19.01 EDT Sign up to the Spin – our weekly cricket round-up County Championship Division One Share via Email Share on Facebook Shares00 County Championship 2008 Division One … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Since you’re here… Share on Facebook County Championship Division One Cricket Read more A first win of the season has taken a while coming, but the champions should take a decent bite out of Nottinghamshire’s lead at the top of the table today. On a wicket that has become increasingly two-paced, Sussex are 171 in front. Add the movement that both sides have found throughout the game, and the remaining five Nottinghamshire batsmen will be looking for help from the weather.Yesterday the home side did not help themselves, dropping catches crucial in a low-scoring match and then finding the gods against them when it came to batting. Faced with a target of 286 they were four down with only 42 on the board, Will Jefferson and Samit Patel both going to leg-side catches by Matt Prior, and Matthew Wood managing to drag on a wide ball he was trying to leave. Share on Messenger Mike Averis at Trent Bridge Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Prior pulls no punches as Sussex close in on first win Reuse this content Support The Guardian Share on Pinterest Share on WhatsApplast_img read more

No US Nexus No Problem As US Brings 305 Million FCPA Enforcement

first_img Elevate Your FCPA Research There are several subject matter tags in this post. However, only subscribers to FCPA Professor’s premium search feature can see and use them in research. Efficient and cost-effective FCPA research is just a click away. Last week the DOJ and SEC announced (here and here) a $30.5 million Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement action against Sociedad Quimica y Minera de Chile S.A. (SQM), a chemical and mining company based in Chile, in relation to its conduct with Chilean officials.The enforcement action is rife with policy issues including the proper scope of FCPA enforcement given that there is no U.S. nexus alleged other than SQM having Series B shares, a form of American Depository Shares, listed on the New York Stock Exchange and thus being required to file periodic reports with the SEC.The enforcement action included: (i) a DOJ criminal information charging SQM with violating the FCPA’s books and records and internal control provisions that was resolved via a deferred prosecution agreement in which the company agreed to pay a $15.5 million criminal penalty; and (ii) an SEC administrative order finding FCPA books and records and internal violations in which the company agreed to pay $15 million civil penalty.DOJUnder the heading “Overview of the Scheme” the information alleges:“From in or around 2008 to 2015, SQM’s corporate budgets included discretionary funding for the office of the Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”). In 2008, the CEO’s discretionary fund was approximately US $3.3 million; in 2014 it was approximately US $5.7 million.Funds budgeted for the CEO’s discretionary fund were designated within SQM’s accounting system as being intended for payment of, among other things, the CEO’s travel, certain of SQM’s publicity efforts, and consulting and advisory services deemed necessary by the CEO.Despite providing for a discretionary fund, SQM knowingly and willfully failed to maintain internal accounting controls that were adequate to ensure that the CEO’s discretionary funds were used for their intended purposes, were used in accordance with the law, and were properly recorded in SQM’s books and records. In fact, SQM Executive [described as a Chilean citizen who was an officer and high-level executive of SQM from 1990 until he was terminated by the company in March 2015 and who was one of the SQM executives responsible for implementing the company’s internal accounting controls – it is not too difficult to figure out from public sources that this person is Patricio Contesse] sought and received assistance from SQM employees to disguise some of the payments by directing them to create fictitious invoices and contracts for services that were not rendered, pay invoices for which there was no evidence of services being performed to justify the payments, and falsely record some of the payments in SQM’s books and ledgers.As a result, during the relevant period, SQM Executive used the CEO’s discretionary fund to direct payments totaling approximately US $14.75 million in SQM funds to Chilean politicians, political candidates, and individuals connected to them (collectively, “politically exposed persons” or “PEPs”), many of which violated Chilean tax law and/or campaign finance limits, and caused payments of those funds to be falsely recorded in the SQM’s books and records.”Under the heading “Improper Payments from the CEO’s Discretionary Fund,” the information alleges in pertinent part:“Between in or around 2008 and 2015, at SQM Executive’s direction, SQM paid approximately US $14.75 million to PEPs and related parties without effective internal accounting controls, such as appropriate due diligence, documentation, or oversight.One way in which SQM made payments to PEPs was by routing payments to foundations supported by politicians. For example, between in or around 2008 and 2013, SQM transferred approximately US $160,000 from the CEO’s discretionary fund to foundations supported by Chilean Official 1.[…]At SQM Executive’s direction, SQM also paid approximately US $630,000 from the CEO’s discretionary fund during the relevant period to foundations controlled by Chilean Official 2, who at times during the relevant period had influence over the Chilean government’s plans for mining in Chile, an issue of central importance to SQM’s business. […]  In addition, Chilean Official 2 asked SQM Executive to support his daughter’s foundation. In or around January 2014, at SQM Executive’s direction, SQM paid approximately US $16,000 to a foundation supported by Chilean Official 2.Another way in which SQM made payments to PEPs was by paying vendors associated with PEPs pursuant to fictitious contracts and invoices for services that were not rendered, or contracts and invoices for which there was no evidence of services being performed. SQM did not conduct due diligence on or obtain anti-corruption representations from its vendors, and it allowed approval of payments to vendors without independent verification that the payments were proper, that the prices charged by the vendors for the purported services were reasonable, or that the services reflected on the vendor invoices had actually been received by SQM.The vendor invoices paid by SQM to vendors associated with PEPs indicated that SQM had received professional services in return for its payments, when in reality, SQM received nothing from the vast majority of the vendors submitting the invoices, and some of the invoices were simply created to disguise payments to PEPs.For example, in or around July 2009, at SQM Executive’s direction, SQM paid approximately US $11,034 on an invoice for purported “financial services” submitted by the sister-in-law of Chilean Official 3. However, Chilean Official 3’s sister-in-law rendered no services to SQM and submitted the invoice solely in order to facilitate a disguised payment by SQM to a Chilean senatorial campaign.Similarly, SQM paid numerous invoices submitted by vendors connected to Chilean Official 4, including approximately US $63,000 between in or around December 2008 and in or around September 2012 for purported “communications advice” from Chilean Official 4’s former advisor and chief of staff, and approximately US $29,000 in or around July through October 2009 for purported “consulting-services” by a relative of Chilean Official 4. SQM made these payments without receiving any evidence that the “communications advice” or “consulting services” were provided, and to date is unable to identify any evidence that they were provided.”Under the heading “SQM’s Falsification of Its Books and Records,” the information alleges:“In connection with the improper payments described above, SQM falsely recorded some of these payments in its books and records in order to conceal the payment scheme.For example, SQM falsely recorded the payments … as “communications advice” and “consulting services” despite knowing that the payments were not, in fact, for such services rendered.In addition to concealing the nature of the payments from the CEO’s discretionary fund, SQM employees, including SQM Executive and other SQM employees, knowingly and willfully disguised the destination of these payments. For example, in or around February 2011, at the direction of SQM Executive, two SQM employees created a fake service contract for a fictitious vendor for the sole purpose of funneling SQM funds to a foundation controlled by Chilean Official 5. Between approximately 2008 and approximately 2012, SQM paid from the CEO’s discretionary fund 36 invoices submitted under the contract, for a total of approximately US $577,000.Similarly, in or around May and in or around June of 2013, an advisor to Chilean Official 1 invoiced SQM for approximately US $4,400 for purported engineering and statistical services. SQM paid the invoice and booked the payment as having been made in return for such services, despite knowing that such services had not been received from the advisor.From 2008 to 2013, at the end of each fiscal year, SQM’s books and records, including those that SQM Executive and others intentionally falsified to justify payments to vendors connected to PEPs, were used for the purpose of preparing SQM’s financial statements. In addition, during each of these years from 2008 to 2013, SQM Executive signed financial certifications as part of SQM’s securities filings that he knew to be false.”Under the heading “SQM’s Continued Failure to Implement Adequate Internal Accounting Controls,” the information alleges:“SQM personnel responsible for implementing and maintaining SQM’s internal accounting controls, including SQM Executive and another high-level executive, became aware of control failures relating to payments from the CEO’s discretionary fund to vendors associated with PEPs but nevertheless failed to take adequate steps to prevent further such payments. For example, during a 2014 internal audit, SQM identified six vendors paid in 2012 and 2013 that had “high risk” connections to PEPs. Each of the identified payments was made from the CEO’s discretionary fund and was authorized by SQM Executive. The internal audit report recommended SQM terminate any active contracts with the six high risk vendors identified, to require a compliance addendum for any future contracts, and to maintain backup documentation for each contract transaction.Despite these internal audit findings, which were summarized for the board of directors, no adequate changes were made to SQM’s internal accounting controls. As a result, SQM’s payments to PEPs continued after this internal audit report for an additional six months. For example, while payments to the son of a Chilean politician stopped in or around September 2014 as a result of the audit, they were replaced by payments to the politician’s aide beginning in or around October 2014.”Based on the above allegations, the information charges SQM with violating the FCPA books and records provisions and internal controls provisions.The criminal charges were resolved via a deferred prosecution agreement which references the following relevant considerations.“a. the Company did not voluntarily self-disclose the conduct …;b, the Company received full cooperation credit based on its cooperation with the Fraud Section’s investigation, which included: conducting a thorough internal investigation; producing relevant documents from overseas, accompanied by translations of key documents, to the Fraud Section; and providing to the Fraud Section all relevant facts known to it, including information about individuals involved in the misconduct; the Company has committed to continue to enhance its compliance program and internal controls, including ensuring that its compliance program satisfies the minimum elements set forth in Attachment C to this Agreement, and has engaged in a number of remedial measures, including: (1) reconstituting and staffing new compliance and internal audit divisions; (2) implementing new internal accounting/payment process controls; (3) revising the corporate Code of Ethics and conducting training for all personnel; (4) voluntarily paying over $9 million in taxes, interest, and penalties to Chilean authorities in connection with the improper payments …; (5) disciplining the employees involved in the improper payments and false books and records … including terminating the employment of a senior officer of the Company and demoting another employee; and (6) providing in-depth anti-corruption and compliance training and consultations with outside compliance and internal controls experts to an employee who failed to take appropriate steps in response to red flags regarding the misconduct;d. although the Company has taken a number of remedial measures, the Company is still in the process of implementing its enhanced compliance program, which has not had an opportunity to be tested, and thus the Company has agreed to the imposition of an independent compliance monitor for a term of two years to diminish the risk of reoccurrence of the misconduct; the independent compliance monitor will serve a term of two years instead of three because of the significant enhancements the Company has already made to its compliance program, and because the Company’s size and risk profile are such that an independent compliance monitor should not need more than two years to test the Company’s compliance program;e, the Company has agreed to continue to cooperate with the Fraud Section;f. the nature and seriousness of the offense, including the involvement of a senior officer at the Company in a six-year scheme to pay millions of dollars to politicians, political candidates, and individuals connected to them in violation of Chilean tax law and/or campaign finance limits, and the falsification of records and the creation of fictitious invoices and contracts to conceal the scheme;g. the Company has no prior criminal history;h. accordingly, after considering (a) through (g) above the Company received an aggregate discount of 25% off of the bottom of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines fine range …”The DPA sets forth an advisory fine range of $20.6 million to $41.3 million and as mentioned above, pursuant to the three year DPA, SQM is required to engage an independent compliance monitor for two years.SECThe SEC’s order is based on the same core conduct alleged in the DOJ action. In summary fashion, the order states:“This matter concerns violations of the books and records and internal control provisions of the FCPA by SQM. From at least 2008 to 2015, SQM made approximately US $14.75 million in improper payments to Chilean politicians, political candidates, and individuals connected to them (collectively, “politically exposed persons” or “PEPs”). Most of the payments were made based on fictitious documentation submitted to SQM by persons and entities associated with PEPs who posed as legitimate vendors to SQM (“third party vendors”). Those payments were not supported by documentation that those third party vendors provided services to SQM. Virtually all of the improper payments to PEPs were directed and authorized by a senior SQM executive.SQM violated the books and records provisions of the FCPA by failing to fairly and accurately reflect in its books, records and accounts that payments SQM ostensibly made to legitimate vendors were actually payments to PEPs. SQM also failed to devise and maintain a system of internal accounting controls sufficient to provide reasonable assurances that the company was not making improper payments to PEPs.”Under the heading “SQM’s Management Failed to Exercise Proper Oversight of the CEO Account,” the order states:“SQM failed to conduct adequate due diligence on the third party entities who received payments from the CEO’s discretionary fund and as a result of a lack of adequate internal accounting controls allowed payments to the third party vendors without verifying that the payments were proper, that the prices charged by the vendors were appropriate, or that SQM had ever received the services reflected on the vendor invoices and contracts.SQM failed to conduct due diligence on such payments to foundations to ensure that the payments were proper and were not going to, or for the benefit of, PEPs.In addition, SQM management failed to exercise any oversight of the CEO Account. For example, in one instance a finance manager sent a senior executive of SQM an email discussing reports that he was preparing related to the activities of the CEO Account. In response to the finance manager’s query, the senior executive told the finance manager to send printed reports directly to SQM Executive only, stating that SQM Executive was “in charge of this.” The senior executive did not conduct any oversight of the CEO Account to determine whether funds were being properly expended by SQM Executive.Ultimately, SQM personnel responsible for implementing and maintaining SQM’s internal accounting controls became aware of control deficiencies related to payments to PEPs but failed to take appropriate steps to prevent further payments.For example, during a 2014 internal audit, SQM personnel identified six vendors paid in 2012 and 2013 that had “high risk” connections to PEPs. Each of the identified payments was made from the CEO Account and was authorized by SQM Executive. The internal audit report recommended SQM terminate any active contracts with the six high-risk vendors identified, require a compliance addendum for any future contracts, and maintain backup documentation for each contract transaction. Despite these internal audit findings, which were provided to SQM Executive and another senior executive of SQM and were summarized for SQM’s board of directors, insufficient changes were made to SQM’s internal accounting controls. As a result, SQM’s improper payments to PEPs continued after the internal audit report for an additional six months.Even when payments to “high risk” recipients were identified by the internal audit in 2014 and suspect contracts were terminated, payments were still made to recipients connected to PEPs. For example, when payments to the relative of a Chilean official were shut down in about September 2014, payments began to be made to that Chilean official’s aide in about October 2014.”Under the heading “Falsification of SQM’s Books and Records,” the order states:“SQM falsely recorded payments to the PEPs and related entities in its books and records as legitimate business expenditures. For example, as described above, SQM falsely recorded improper payments to PEPs as legitimate expenses for “financial services,” “communications advice,” “consulting services,” and “engineering services,” despite the fact that the payments were not for those services but were actually payments funneled to PEPs.SQM failed to devise and maintain an adequate system of internal controls over the use of the CEO Account to ensure that the CEO Account expenditures were not used for unauthorized purposes, such as the payments to PEPs. For example, SQM’s senior management and board did not conduct adequate review and oversight of expenditures of the CEO Account, including payments to foundations; management gave complete deference to SQM Executive’s discretion of how to spend funds allocated to the CEO Account; SQM Executive was the sole authorization for expenditures; insufficient due diligence was performed on the third party entities submitting fictitious invoices and contracts; SQM’s procedures did not require independent verification that services invoiced had been provided before purchase orders were released; and SQM staff members arranged and executed the payments without oversight of those assignments by other senior management. The use of the CEO Account to make payments to PEPs was contrary to management’s authorization and SQM’s internal policies. SQM failed to devise and maintain a system of internal accounting controls sufficient to provide reasonable assurances that its expenditures through third party vendors was done in accordance with management’s authorization.”Based on the above, the order finds that SQM violated the FCPA books and records and internal controls provisions and the company agreed to pay a $15 million civil penalty.The order contains a separate section titled “Internal Investigation and Remedial Efforts,” which states:“In 2015, in response to inquiries from Chilean tax authorities and related news articles in the Chilean press, SQM conducted an internal investigation based on allegations that SQM had taken improper tax deductions for payments to certain vendors. As a result of its internal investigation, SQM undertook remedial measures, including: terminating SQM Executive; creating a Corporate Governance Committee; strengthening the Internal Audit department and creating a separate Compliance and Risk Management department and requiring them report to SQM’s board of directors; hiring additional compliance and auditing staff with significant experience; expanding accounting and compliance systems; making personnel changes to General Counsel’s office; hiring outside experts to review and improve SQM’s payment process controls and approvals, including controls related to payment process, due diligence of vendors, verification of services provided, and restrictions concerning potential conflicts of interest; reformulating SQM’s Code of Ethics; enhancing mandatory training related to the Code of Ethics, compliance and internal controls; and fully cooperating with Chilean and U.S. authorities.Upon the commencement of its internal investigation, SQM self-reported potential FCPA violations to the Commission and fully cooperated with the Commission’s investigation. SQM subsequently provided extensive and thorough cooperation. SQM voluntarily provided reports of its investigative findings; shared its analysis of documents and summaries of witness interviews; and responded to the Commission’s requests for documents and information and provided translations of key documents.”In the SEC’s release, Stephanie Avakian (Acting Director of the SEC Enforcement Division) stated:“SQM permitted millions of dollars in payments to local politicians while failing for years to exercise proper oversight over a key discretionary account and internal controls.”*****J. Allen Miller and Keith Rosen (Chadbourne & Parke) represented SQM.On the day the enforcement action was announced, SQM’s U.S. shares closed up 1.05%. Elevate Your Researchlast_img read more

State Patrol to Buy Back Bump StocksKeith Goehner Outlines Session Work in

first_imgDistrict 6 residents can take advantage of the program in Wenatchee on March 17th-18 and in Ellenburg on March 24-25thWith the Governor’s signing of Senate Bill 5954, the Washington State Patrol (WSP) will hold its Bump Stock Buy-Back Program on March 17-18 and March 24-25. Washington State residents will have an opportunity to turn in their bump stocks before the federal law banning the devices takes effect on March 26, 2019.Bump stocks replace the standard stock and grip of a semi-automatic firearm and allow the recoil of discharge to be used to fire the gun in very rapid succession. This simulates fully automatic fire and can be inaccurate and extremely dangerous. Effective March 26, 2019, the US Department of Justice is amending the regulations of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) to clarify that bump stock type devices are machine guns as defined by the National Firearms Act of 1934 and the Gun Control Act of 1968.Machine guns are illegal in Washington and Senate Bill 5954 allows Washington residents the opportunity to turn in up to five bump stock type devices and receive $150 per device. The bill appropriates $150,000 for the program.Individuals can visit any of the WSP offices listed below on March 17-18 and March 24-25 between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM to exchange their bump stocks for a voucher. Individuals can also turn in their devices directly to the ATF or other law enforcement agencies where they will receive a written receipt. They can then bring the receipt into the WSP office listed and get a voucher for the $150.Once their voucher is processed, the WSP will mail individuals a check for $150 for each bump stock they turn in. No checks will be issued the day an individual turns in their bump stock. There is a limit of five bump stocks per individual, and all vouchers will be issued on a first-come, first-serve basis. Once the $150,000 appropriated in Senate Bill 5954 has been distributed, no more funds will be available.Dates and Times March 17-18, 2019 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM District 1 – Tacoma – 2502 112th Street East District 2 – Bellevue – 2803 156th Avenue SE District 3 – Kennewick – 143302 E Law Lane District 4 – Spokane – 6403 W Rowand Rd District 5 – Vancouver – 11018 NE 51st Circle District 6 – Wenatchee – 2822 Euclid Avenue District 7 – Marysville – 2700 116th Street NE District 8 – Hoquiam – 3111 Pacific AvenueMarch 24-25, 2019 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM District 1 – Tacoma – 2502 112th Street East District 2 – South Seattle – 15666 International Blvd (detachment office) District 3 – Yakima – 2715 Rudkin Road District 4 – Spokane – 6403 W Rowand Rd District 5 – Vancouver – 11018 NE 51st Circle District 6 – Ellensburg – 291 S Thorp Hwy District 7 – Marysville – 2700 116th Street NE District 8 – Bremerton – 4811 Werner RoadCriteria Individuals must be a Washington resident (an official Washington driver’s license and/or identification card is required) Individuals must have a valid mailing address There is a limit of five bump stocks per personProcedure An individual may bring in an operable or inoperable bump stock to the listed WSP offices. An individual may also turn in the device(s) to the ATF or other law enforcement agencies to obtain a receipt. (Individuals must then bring the receipt to one of the listed WSP district office on the designated dates/times to receive a voucher for payment.) An Individual must present a valid Washington driver’s license or identification card. At the WSP office, the individual will complete a voucher form with a valid mailing address. The WSP will process the voucher for payment. The WSP will mail a check to the individual at the mailing address provided on their original voucher form.More information can be found at: www.wsp.wa.gov/buyback###last_img read more

James Appleby Know Your Dose

first_imgby, James Appleby, special to ChangingAging.orgTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesGetting older is one of life’s inescapables, although life is certainly better now for older Americans than at any other time in history. We live longer, more active lives than our parents and grandparents certainly did – today’s average 65 year-old man and woman can expect to live to be 81 and 85, respectively – and science has proven that we’re still able to learn new things, even if we don’t learn as quickly as we did in our younger years. These are all things to celebrateTry as we may to slow down the process, however, the clock keeps ticking and eventually, the aches and pains of aging will catch up to all of us. Among the many new things older adults need to learn is how best to manage these pains safely.  The most common self-care issue for older adults is pain relief, and older Americans experience chronic pain more than other age group. Learning how to use nonprescription medicines commonly used to relieve the aches and pains of aging is of particular importance. Know Your DoseMost people don’t realize that one of the common links across pain medicines is acetaminophen–the most common drug ingredient in America. It is found in more than 600 over-the-counter and prescription medicines. Acetaminophen is used to relieve pain from conditions such as arthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, and headaches, but what most people don’t realize is that it’s also an active ingredient in many prescription and over-the-counter medicines used to provide relief from pain, allergy and cold symptoms, cough, and reduce fevers.While acetaminophen, like other nonprescription medicines for pain, is safe and effective when used appropriately, it is possible to take too much.  This can happen if you use more than one medicine for pain relief, and then need another for relief from a different condition, such seasonal allergy symptoms. Taking too much acetaminophen is an overdose and can lead to liver damage.All Americans, regardless of how old they are, need to be aware of how to use pain relievers safely.  In the case of acetaminophen, a new campaign called Know Your Dose boils it down to three steps: Know your dose. Read medicine labels and follow instructions, and never take more than the label says. Know if your medicines contain acetaminophen. Check the active ingredients on the medicine label, especially if you take multiple medicines. On prescription labels, acetaminophen is sometimes labeled as “APAP,” “acetam,” or other shortened versions of the word. On over-the-counter medicines, the word “acetaminophen” is highlighted and listed on the front of the package or on the bottle and in the active ingredient of the Drug Facts label. And never take two medicines that contain acetaminophen at the same time. Our bodies change as we get older, and in some cases, our bodies metabolize acetaminophen differently. Health care providers and community pharmacists are important resources. They may seem busy, but they want to help.  It’s important to take the time to ask for their advice.View a list of common medicines that contain acetaminophen at KnowYourDose.org and access tips on reading over-the-counter and prescription medicine labels. Related PostsBreaking the Reframe on AgingThe reframing aging movement must demand a decent quality of life for the millions of older adults who were good workers, neighbors, taxpayers and citizens and came up short through no fault of their own.Wise Up: Study AgingI am certainly not blind to how fortuitously my interest in aging aligns with the needs of an aging world—and I certainly don’t need additional convincing that my decision to forgo law school was in equal measure, wise and slightly prescient. But maybe you do.The Six Assets of AgingThe deterioration-decline meme that defines aging in our culture originates in a narrow perception of the lifespan that is blind to the priceless assets we accrue as we add years to our lives.TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: acetaminophen drugs knowyourdose Pharma Questions: Aginglast_img read more

Humans Blamed for Loss of Mammoths and Other Giants

About 12,000 years ago or so, at the end of the last ice age, many giant species—including woolly mammoths, woolly rhinos (image), and saber-toothed cats—disappeared. Proposed causes have included everything from climate change and the spread of humans to virulent diseases and an extraterrestrial impact over eastern Canada. The latest salvo in the debate, the first to look at species-level data on a country-by-country basis worldwide, pins the blame largely on humans. The researchers looked at the pattern of extinctions for 177 species of mammals weighing 10 kilograms or more between 132,000 years ago (the height of the next-to-last ice age to strike the Northern Hemisphere) and 1000 years ago (a time at which the ecological effects of human exploration and expansion became unquestionable). The proportion of large mammal species that died out during that interval was most closely related to the global expansion of humans, the team reports online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Despite that link, the researchers say, it’s not clear from this analysis whether humans directly wiped the creatures out by hunting them or merely changed their habitats (by burning the landscape to clear it for hunting or other activities) so much that they couldn’t survive. In general, the researchers note, the longer humans had inhabited an area (and, therefore, the longer that the animals and humans had coexisted), the lower the proportion of large mammal extinctions that occurred there. In some areas, particularly in Eurasia, climate change—as measured by changes in temperature and precipitation from 21,000 years ago until now—also seems to have influenced extinction rates. However, the researchers note, it’s possible that the magnitude of climate change in those regions substantially affected patterns of human dispersal and that it was this, not climate change itself, that wiped out large mammals. read more

Mercury levels in surface ocean have tripled

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) In the 1950s, a neurological epidemic killed thousands of villagers in the seaside town of Minamata, Japan, and caused mental retardation in newborns. Only later did the villagers learn that the fish they ate had been contaminated with toxic mercury dumped by a local chemical plant. Now, new research suggests human activities since the Industrial Revolution have tripled the amount of mercury in shallow parts of the ocean, posing a threat to human health worldwide.The study presents an impressive set of empirical data collection across oceans, says David Streets, an environmental policy scientist at Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois, who was not involved in the research. “This is the first time, to my knowledge, that a group [has] tried to give an overview of all the major ocean areas,” he says. “It’s a valuable data set.”Industrial processes such as small-scale gold mining and coal burning emit mercury into the atmosphere. In gold mining, miners use liquid mercury to soak up gold from ore, then vaporize the toxic metal while leaving the gold behind. Burning coal releases mercury naturally contained in the fuel. Once in the atmosphere, the metal can travel for months and thousands of kilometers until rain deposits it into oceans. There, bacteria help convert it to the neurotoxin methylmercury. The methylmercury then travels up the food chain, ultimately accumulating in fish. Consuming contaminated seafood is the single leading source of mercury exposure for people, says Carl Lamborg, an oceanographer at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. But monitoring mercury levels in the oceans has proven a challenge for researchers because the metal is present only in tiny concentrations in seawater, and gathering samples from different oceans requires time and resources.So an international team led by Lamborg embarked on cruises to the Atlantic, Pacific, Southern, and Arctic oceans and spent 8 years collecting water samples at various depths. The cruises were conducted under the international GEOTRACES program, which sends ships around the globe to map the distribution of key trace elements in the oceans.Sifting through data gathered from the cruises, Lamborg and his colleagues observed that unpolluted waters, such as waters more than 1000 meters deep in the Pacific Ocean, contain a fixed ratio of mercury to phosphate, a better studied substance. The team used this ratio as a benchmark to identify and compare levels of mercury pollution caused by human activities across water samples from different oceans.But calculating mercury that originated from human activities (as opposed to natural processes like the breakdown of rocks on land) required an additional step. To scale the calculations to ocean-wide estimates, the team crosschecked the amount of mercury they derived with the extensively studied greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) as a proxy. They found that across ocean basins, the ratio of human-generated mercury to human-generated CO2 tends to stay consistent among waters in the same layer of depth, because coal burning, for example, emits both mercury and CO2. Using existing databases of CO2 measured in ocean waters, the team derived an index relating the two substances, and used it to estimate the amount and distribution of mercury contributed by human activities in different ocean basins.The calculations suggest that the ocean contains about 60,000 to 80,000 tons of mercury from pollution, with almost two-thirds residing in water shallower than a thousand meters, the team reports online today in Nature. Mercury concentration in waters shallower than 100 meters has tripled compared with preindustrial times, they found, whereas mercury levels in intermediate waters have increased by 1.5 times. Higher mercury concentrations in shallower waters could increase the amount of toxin accumulating in food fish, exposing humans to greater risk of mercury poisoning, Lamborg says. Countries ringing the North Atlantic Ocean, where the mercury concentration is among the highest recorded in the study, may be particularly vulnerable.Even with these data, researchers still can’t ascertain the impact of rising levels of mercury on marine fish, and on the people who consume them, Lamborg notes. That’s because scientists still don’t know precisely how inorganic mercury transforms into toxic methylmercury.The findings contradict previous thought that the Gold Rush of the 1850s was a major source of mercury to the oceans. Lamborg says his results suggest mercury from past gold mining in the United States might have been deposited in nearby soils instead of in the ocean.Streets points out that more research is needed to paint a better picture of the mercury cycle. “There are still big gaps in our understanding of how mercury moves between air, soil, and water, and between different parts of the world,” he says. “This paper is a good estimate of mercury in oceanic water, but it’s only part of the bigger picture.”Now, more than a hundred nations have signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, an international treaty to reduce mercury emission levels through measures such as banning new mercury mines. “I hope that these data will help countries in terms of assessing how badly we need to regulate mercury emission,” Lamborg says.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Study of massive preprint archive hints at the geography of plagiarism

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) New analyses of the hundreds of thousands of technical manuscripts submitted to arXiv, the repository of digital preprint articles, are offering some intriguing insights into the consequences—and geography—of scientific plagiarism. It appears that copying text from other papers is more common in some nations than others, but the outcome is generally the same for authors who copy extensively: Their papers don’t get cited much.Since its founding in 1991, arXiv has become the world’s largest venue for sharing findings in physics, math, and other mathematical fields. It publishes hundreds of papers daily and is fast approaching its millionth submission. Anyone can send in a paper, and submissions don’t get full peer review. However, the papers do go through a quality-control process. The final check is a computer program that compares the paper’s text with the text of every other paper already published on arXiv. The goal is to flag papers that have a high likelihood of having plagiarized published work.”Text overlap” is the technical term, and sometimes it turns out to be innocent. For example, a review article might quote generously from a paper the author cites, or the author might recycle and slightly update sentences from their own previous work. The arXiv plagiarism detector gives such papers a pass. “It’s a fairly sophisticated machine learning logistic classifier,” says arXiv founder Paul Ginsparg, a physicist at Cornell University. “It has special ways of detecting block quotes, italicized text, text in quotation marks, as well statements of mathematical theorems, to avoid false positives.” Only when there is no obvious reason for an author to have copied significant chunks of text from already published work—particularly if that previous work is not cited and has no overlap in authorship—does the software affix a “flag” to the article, including links to the papers from which it has text overlap. That standard “is much more lenient” than those used by most scientific journals, Ginsparg says.To explore some of the consequences of “text reuse,” Ginsparg and Cornell physics Ph.D. student Daniel Citron compared the text from each of the 757,000 articles submitted to arXiv between 1991 and 2012. The headline from that study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) is that the more text a paper poaches from already published work, the less frequently that paper tends to be cited. (The full paper is also available for free on arXiv.) It also found that text reuse is surprisingly common. After filtering out review articles and legitimate quoting, about one in 16 arXiv authors were found to have copied long phrases and sentences from their own previously published work that add up to about the same amount of text as this entire article. More worryingly, about one out of every 1000 of the submitting authors copied the equivalent of a paragraph’s worth of text from other people’s papers without citing them.So where in the world is all this text reuse happening? Conspicuously missing from the PNAS paper is a global map of potential plagiarism. Whenever an author submits a paper to arXiv, the author declares his or her country of residence. So it should be possible to reveal which countries have the highest proportion of plagiarists. The reason no map was included, Ginsparg told ScienceInsider, is that all the text overlap detected in their study is not necessarily plagiarism.Ginsparg did agree, however, to share arXiv’s flagging data with ScienceInsider. Since 1 August 2011, when arXiv began systematically flagging for text overlap, 106,262 authors from 151 nations have submitted a total of 301,759 articles. (Each paper can have many more co-authors.) Overall, 3.2% (9591) of the papers were flagged. It’s not just papers submitted en masse by a few bad apples, either. Those flagged papers came from 6% (6737) of the submitting authors. Put another way, one out of every 16 researchers who have submitted a paper to arXiv since August 2011 has been flagged by the plagiarism detector at least once.The map above, prepared by ScienceInsider, takes a conservative approach. It shows only the incidence of flagged authors for the 57 nations with at least 100 submitted papers, to minimize distortion from small sample sizes. (In Ethiopia, for example, there are only three submitting authors and two of them have been flagged.)Researchers from countries that submit the lion’s share of arXiv papers—the United States, Canada, and a small number of industrialized countries in Europe and Asia—tend to plagiarize less often than researchers elsewhere. For example, more than 20% (38 of 186) of authors who submitted papers from Bulgaria were flagged, more than eight times the proportion from New Zealand (five of 207). In Japan, about 6% (269 of 4759) of submitting authors were flagged, compared with over 15% (164 out of 1054) from Iran.Such disparities may be due in part to different academic cultures, Ginsparg and Citron say in their PNAS study. They chalk up scientific plagiarism to “differences in academic infrastructure and mentoring, or incentives that emphasize quantity of publication over quality.”*Correction, 11 December, 4:57 p.m.:  The map has been corrected to reflect current national boundaries. Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Personalized cancer vaccines may fight tumors

first_imgCancer treatments that harness the body’s immune system to wipe out tumors have begun paying off for some patients for whom all other therapies have failed. Now, a small clinical study has found support for a newcomer on the cancer immunotherapy front. Injected with a vaccine designed to match specific mutations in their tumors, three patients with advanced melanoma had a strong immune response and in two their tumors shrunk or stabilized, at least temporarily. Although the study was mainly meant to test safety, the results suggest it holds promise for stopping tumors from growing.“There’s a lot of excitement about this approach,” says oncologist and cancer immunologist Craig Slingluff of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, who was not involved with the study.Vaccines for infectious diseases typically deliver into the body bits of protein or other material from a virus or bacterium that trigger the immune system to defend against the invading pathogen. With cancer, the similar idea is to vaccinate a patient with immune-stimulating molecules, known as antigens, found only on tumor cells, so that the person’s immune system ends up attacking the tumor. But cancer vaccines have a poor record of success. That’s because most of the tumor antigens tested also appear in small amounts on healthy cells, and the immune system has mechanisms that make it tolerate, or ignore, these familiar antigens. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Scientists have their eye on a more promising kind of tumor antigen: those that result from the mutations that riddle a tumor’s DNA, thanks to the chaos cancer causes to a genome. Some of these mutations do not appear in genes that drive cancer growth, but instead code for novel peptides—short proteins—that may act as antigens on the surface of tumor cells. Because these so-called neoantigens are completely foreign to the body, they could in theory make a cancer vaccine.Devising a neoantigen cancer vaccine requires sequencing a lot of tumor DNA, which wasn’t feasible or affordable until recently. But now that DNA sequencing costs have dropped and speeds increased, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have begun exploring neoantigen cancer vaccines for melanoma, a tumor in which the sun’s ultraviolet light that sparks cancer-causing mutations also creates hundreds of additional mutations that are likely to include many coding for neoantigens.Human immunologist Beatriz Carreno, trial leader Gerald Linette, and collaborators recently studied three melanoma patients who had surgery to remove their tumors, but who had cancer cells that had spread to their lymph nodes, making tumors likely to recur. The researchers sequenced the exome, or protein-coding DNA, of each patient’s original melanoma tumor and compared it with the exome of their other cells to identify dozens of mutations coding for newly created peptides that might act as neoantigens. (Not all peptides made by a cell get displayed on its surface.) They analyzed the possible neoantigens’ structures and did lab tests to predict which are actually made by the cell and get displayed on its surface, then homed in on those most likely to trigger an immune response. For each melanoma patient they chose seven neoantigens unique to that person’s tumor.After taking blood from each patient and harvesting from it immune sentinels called dendritic cells, the researchers then mixed each patient’s set of neoantigens with these white blood cells so that they would display the peptides to other immune cells. The team used the neoantigen-coated dendritic cells to make personalized neoantigen vaccines that were infused into the patients three times over about 4 months.Carreno and collaborators found that a key measure of vaccine response, the number of immune system T cells specific to the neoantigens in each patient, rose in the patients’ blood, along with an increase in the diversity of these T cells. These neoantigen-specific T cells could also kill cultured melanoma cells expressing the same neoantigens, the team reports online today in Science.In one patient, metastatic tumors in the woman’s lungs shrank, then regrew, but are now stable after 8 months; the second person’s tumor remnants have also been stable for 9 months. A third patient who had received an immunotherapy drug after surgery that put his cancer in remission remains cancer-free. However, the trial was designed primarily to confirm the safety of the vaccine and immune response, not to test its effectiveness, and because the patients received other treatments, it is not possible to say whether the vaccine helped: “I would be speculating if I said that the vaccine had any benefit to the patients,” Linette says.But the fact that the study found “a pretty high magnitude of immune response,” combined with recent reports that a different neoantigen vaccine can fight cancer in mice, suggests the idea is “promising,” Slingluff says.Such a vaccine, which should be less toxic than chemotherapy, might be used to prevent cancer from recurring after surgery. It might also be combined with other immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors that seem to work best for cancers such as lung and melanoma in which tumors have many mutations. “The high anticipation is whether the one-two punch with checkpoint inhibition would work,” says Roger Lo, a melanoma researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emaillast_img read more

In potential blow to conservation efforts US court rules restoration moves harmed

first_img A federal judge ruled last week that a federal agency’s actions to improve habitats for endangered species along the Missouri River exacerbated floods, causing damage to local farmers whose land was temporarily inundated. Although this was only the first part of a multiphase case, if the ruling is upheld it could undermine future river restoration efforts nationwide and stymie enforcement of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) by forcing the government to pay damages to any landowner affected by environmental restoration activities.“The implications of this ruling are huge,” says Brad Walker, who headed river restoration efforts for the Missouri Coalition for the Environment in St. Louis before retiring earlier this month. “It’s attacking the heart of the legitimacy and reason for doing river restoration.” If the ruling is upheld in the next phase of the case, which is anything but certain, “it would effectively kill the application of the Endangered Species Act,” says John Echeverria, an environmental lawyer at the Vermont Law School in South Royalton.The case, filed in 2014, was brought by a group of 372 landowners along the Missouri River in Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Iowa. They claimed that efforts by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to manage water releases from upstream dams to benefit endangered fish and wildlife habitat exacerbated floods in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2013, and 2014. According to the plaintiffs, this caused an estimated $300 million in damage. They claim the flooding represented a government “takings” of their property, violating the U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment, which prevents the government from seizing private property. Ultimately, Judge Nancy Firestone of the U.S. Court of Federal Claims in Washington, D.C., selected 44 landowners to serve as “bellwether plaintiffs” to assess the claims. By Robert F. ServiceMar. 20, 2018 , 11:20 AM In potential blow to conservation efforts, U.S. court rules restoration moves harmed farmers Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Don Becker, U.S. Geological Survey center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Historically, the Missouri River, known as “the Big Muddy,” followed a meandering, braided path and flooded annually, says Robert Criss, a hydrologist at Washington University in St. Louis. Beginning in the 1930s, engineers constructed a series of six dams and reservoirs. They also narrowed and straightened the river to allow barge navigation, and constructed hundreds of miles of levees along its banks. The changes destroyed nearly all of the shallow water marshes critical for fish and wildlife, Walker says. That prompted lawsuits by environmental groups that compelled the Corps to include habitat restoration in its management plans for the river. Starting in 2004, the Corps began holding more water in reservoirs over the winter and spring to provide more water for fish and wildlife during the summer months. They also reopened previously blocked side channels to create more shallow water habitat.On 13 March, Firestone ruled that those changes exacerbated floods in all the years in question except 2011, when the flooding was so extreme that the Corps would have been unable to prevent it no matter what actions it took. She also ruled that the flooding was a foreseeable result of the Corps management plan. Farmers in the region welcomed the ruling, as did Senator Roy Blunt (R–MO). “I’m pleased that the Federal Claims Court has found what Missouri families, farmers, and business owners have been saying for more than a decade: The Army Corps of Engineers’ mismanagement of the Missouri River has resulted in widespread damages with substantial costs,” Blunt said in a statement.Next, the government will have a chance to lay out its defense. Among its likely arguments, Echeverria says, is that though temporary flooding can harm farmland, it is not the same as permanent seizing of property by the government. The U.S. Flood Control Act of 1968 also prevents the U.S. government from being held liable for flood control actions it takes. “I don’t think the government can be held liable,” Echeverria says. If it is, the judge will then determine the amount damages landowners are entitled to receive.Such monetary awards would have major implications for environmental restoration efforts around the country and could severely undermine the ESA, Echeverria and others predict. For ESA proponents, “it’s a cause for serious concern,” Echeverria says. A final victory by the plaintiffs could prompt landowners in other river basins, such as the Klamath River in Oregon and California to claim similar damages from restoration efforts, Echeverria says.Even if the government ultimately prevails, the case may still have a chilling effect on river restoration efforts in the future. “There is little doubt that farmers along the Missouri Valley, their federal and state government representatives (including Senator Roy Blunt), and the Ag Lobby (which includes the Corn Growers Association) will use the ruling to publicly bludgeon environmentalists,” Robert Schneiders, an environmental historian who has written two books about the Missouri River, wrote in an email. “For Big Ag, this ruling will be the public relations gift that keeps giving.”last_img read more

EPA panel seeks to bring back fired scientists for cleanair review

first_imgU.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler dismissed an auxiliary panel of air pollution experts last fall. Originally published by E&E NewsA fractured EPA advisory panel is asking for help as its ability to handle a high-stakes review of particulate matter standards is under harsh scrutiny.At a public teleconference yesterday, the seven-member Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee agreed to recommend that EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler reconvene an auxiliary panel of experts he abruptly fired last October—or name a new panel made up of members with similar know-how. There’s no assurance, however, the EPA chief will honor the request. A former contract lobbyist whose clients had included the nation’s largest privately owned coal company, Wheeler has given little explanation for his decision to disband the auxiliary panel, which was charged with helping the main committee in its review of the existing national limits on airborne particulate pollution (Greenwire, Oct. 12, 2018).In an email this afternoon, an EPA spokeswoman said Wheeler will take all of the committee’s advice under consideration. Tony Cox, a Denver-based consultant who chairs the committee, said in an email that members have not discussed how to proceed if Wheeler rejects it. Also unclear is whether revival of the auxiliary panel would act as a drag on completing the review by EPA’s self-imposed deadline of December 2020.The committee, usually known by its acronym of CASAC, is charged with offering independent advice to EPA during the review of the particulate standards, which were last revised in 2012. But its members’ fitness to do their jobs again came under biting attack yesterday from former CASAC members and other critics.”This process is a travesty,” Lianne Sheppard, an ex-member who is on the University of Washington’s public health faculty, said during one of two sessions allotted for public feedback during the teleconference. Sheppard was one of more than a dozen people to speak, many of whom were similarly cutting.For the committee, the call’s primary purpose was to hammer out a final version of its report on a draft EPA roundup of scientific research on particulate matter’s health and ecological effects. That draft roundup, released last fall and formally known as an integrated science assessment (ISA), cited evidence the existing standards are too weak.The CASAC’s preliminary report, made public early this month, had slammed the EPA document for employing “unverifiable opinions” to draw its conclusions and a litany of other alleged flaws. For the committee’s detractors, the scathing tone and tentative findings fueled suspicions the panel has no intention of conducting an impartial review.In a paper published last week, two of those critics accused Cox of pursuing an approach that would make it far more difficult for EPA to strengthen air quality standards to protect public health. Underlying calls for the revival of the auxiliary panel, which was made up mostly of scientists and researchers from academia, is the fact that the CASAC’s current members mostly lack a deep background in air pollution research.Cox, who has previously done work for the oil and chemical industries, had previously described the preliminary report as a CASAC document and accused opponents of distorting his views. Yesterday, however, he took responsibility for the language that has drawn the most attention and offered a partial mea culpa.While Cox did not disavow the views underlying his earlier broadside, he said he “made a bad mistake by holding out this ideal of what science should be and then criticizing the ISA for not adhering to that ideal.” A more useful approach, he said, would be to make specific recommendations for what the ISA should do “that it doesn’t do now.”The bulk of the call was dedicated to hashing out a final version of the preliminary report the committee could then send to Wheeler with its blessing. All of the committee’s seven members are rookies to EPA’s intricate process for reviewing air quality standards. During the call, there were occasional struggles to follow Cox as he proposed major changes to the preliminary report.”Where are we? What page are you on?” Steve Packham, a Utah state air official, asked at one point. The call, which had been scheduled to last four hours, ran closer to six. Citing a previous commitment, Corey Masuca, another member based in Alabama, dropped out early but left instructions with the EPA employee running the teleconference that he would go along with whatever the committee agreed on.Dominating the remaining discussions were Cox and Mark Frampton, a retired professor of medicine from the University of Rochester; the two politely but repeatedly clashed over specific “wordsmithing” changes to the preliminary assessment. One of the lengthier debates involved whether to recommend that the research underpinning the ISA’s conclusions should be “independently reproducible and verifiable.””This could be read as indicating that all studies should be thrown out unless somebody has gone in and reproduced them,” Frampton said. The wording, he indicated, reminded him of former EPA chief Scott Pruitt’s controversial proposal to more broadly bar the use of studies in drafting new regulations for which the underlying data were not transparent and reproducible.”The thing is, it should be independently reproducible—otherwise it’s not science,” Cox later replied, shortly before broaching a compromise that appeared to win Frampton’s assent. At the call’s conclusion, committee members verbally signed off on some significant changes to the original draft. Those changes will now be incorporated into a final version that will go to Wheeler; besides urging revival of the auxiliary panel, the committee is also calling on EPA to do a second draft of the ISA.Under the Clean Air Act, particulate matter is one of a half-dozen “criteria” pollutants for which EPA is supposed to periodically review and, if needed, tighten National Ambient Air Quality Standards.The use of auxiliary panels to augment the main CASAC’s expertise dates back decades. In defending Wheeler’s decision to fire the particulate matter review panel last fall, a spokesman said it was consistent with the Clean Air Act and the CASAC’s charter, neither of which mentions such panels.In response to a congressional query preceding his Senate confirmation earlier this year, Wheeler said he believed that the main committee “has the experience and expertise needed to serve in this capacity.” He added that EPA can also tap advice from other experts to assist the CASAC as needed.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2019. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) EPA panel seeks to bring back fired scientists for clean-air review Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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35 Positive Images Of Black Fathers And Children

first_img 10. @RodriquezKhaliq I thought you’d appreciate this. “Fathers walk their kids to school program! (Cleveland,Oh) My nephews are a part of this program walking their Kids to school. There are positive Black Men visible in the Black community & homes. pic.twitter.com/Bf1SuQCVcU— Randall Trevell (Music Is Life) (@Randydapsalmist) September 22, 2018 15. #Repost @blackvegantube・・・This made me smile. #blackfathers have always existed!!! The narrative is changing. Ase’_#blackfathers#blackdads#blackmen#blackmenmattersVIA: @moorland_nativeVia @vintage_vegan_ pic.twitter.com/O5o09BF3gR— HABESHA, Inc. (@HABESHAINC) June 6, 2019 SUBSCRIBE 12. Who’s trying to make me cry today? This is so cute! #blackfathersmatter pic.twitter.com/mf0LPROoJJ— 𝕁𝕖𝕤𝕤 (@thereddempress_) October 10, 2018 Scroll down to see some of the most positive images of Black fathers and their children that mainstream media many times will gloss over in favor of portraying white dads and their children as the golden standard of male parenting. Happy Fathers Day to all fathers who are positively involved and 100 percent engaged in their children’s lives. 31. Black father Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood. For instance, dads bathed, diapered, play or dressed their kids every day, compared with white fathers and Latino fathers, according to a report by the National Center for Health Statistics. pic.twitter.com/m1aWHEIhX0— Brother Tyrone X (@tyrone345345) July 1, 2018 But with much of society implicitly biased against Black people as a whole and Black males in particular, sometimes seeing can compel someone to believe before reading written facts from reliable sources. That’s why NewsOne has compiled this considerable list of video examples of Black fathers doting on their children and flaunting their love by posting footage to social media of their affectionate interactions.Many of these videos have gone viral over time, with the most recent offering being a father recording a verbal exchange between him and his infant child, who is seen not speaking English but still communicating quite effectively with his dad. The two are shown sitting on a couch with the child speaking without actual words to which the father casually replies conversational style. Father & Son road trip @gumball3000 editionA post shared by the Real Swizz (@therealswizzz) on Jun 15, 2019 at 10:35am PDT View this post on Instagram 7. #blackfathersmatter pic.twitter.com/oLyUA6BHv1— Caliyah’s mommy (@loveli_tete) June 8, 2019 6. Black Fathers Matter @SavageHipsters IG:Maniesco_#BlackLivesMatter pic.twitter.com/Ze4FAg7ihe— Maniesco (@SavageHipsters) June 15, 2019 21. Black fathers, we see you, we appreciate you and love you. Thank you for help raising Kingsand Queens . Let’s kill the stereotypes! #BlackFathers #GroomNGlory pic.twitter.com/HXZeLhme7F— Groom N’ Glory (@GroomNGlory) April 11, 2018 27. I’m just dropping by to share with you guys that black men/fathers are magic too. I hope this finds your TL’s pic.twitter.com/WAtaH2OFo2— Mother (@nangi_noruka) February 18, 2017 5. BLACK FATHERS MATTER @MurdaMurrr pic.twitter.com/GLpXIs1xvJ— hennywithmyKoke (@FlynnAlKapone) June 8, 2019 2. Black Fathers will change the mindset of our next generation by simply being present And we will continue to push THIS narrative no matter how much we are attacked.. #ChangeTheNarrative pic.twitter.com/0o2IC7NIyn— Faithful Black Men Association (@OfficialFBMA) January 22, 2019 13. Black Fathers matter! Brushing teeth with Daddy!! @NewEdition @NewEditionBET @WOODY_THEGREAT @TheEllenShow #blackfathers #BlackExcellence @TheShadeRoomm pic.twitter.com/xhpnbCVeTX— Material Girl (@bombshellslam) September 10, 2018 22. #BlackFathers my bundle of joy pic.twitter.com/fqyQp7v2Ii— KD (@TrenchBoyKd) March 24, 2018 28. Magic I tell you! Black fathers are Magic pic.twitter.com/ACySNY6E1S— Mother (@nangi_noruka) April 11, 2017 On Father’s Day in 2019, the stereotype that Black fathers are absent from their children’s lives has somehow persisted despite hard data from research that definitively says otherwise. From eating meals with their children to reading to them to playing with them to changing diapers and more, Black fathers have statistically been more involved in their children’s lives than white fathers, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.READ MORE: Black Dads Are Deeply Involved In Their Kids’ Lives 11. #blackfathersmatter pic.twitter.com/1Ih3SaZu3Y— Charles C. Primas (@cprim72) June 9, 2019 33. Gang pic.twitter.com/uDONttR20u— i was here (@BadNewsMarzo) June 4, 2015 29. Is it me or did it just get dusty in here? RT @ibrealkneck this is great. we need more black fathers like this. pic.twitter.com/Vi5zfWm95F— Matthew A. Cherry (@MatthewACherry) July 30, 2016center_img 4. BLACK FATHERS MATTER @G9D___ pic.twitter.com/23IYLHEoe7— hennywithmyKoke (@FlynnAlKapone) June 6, 2019 The scene shattered misconceptions surrounding Black fathers and their children and the two of them displayed the type of love for each other that is rarely associated with African-Americans in mainstream media. Even better, the father was doing his child a great service by conversationally connecting with him on such an intimate level. Studies have shown that parents consistently talking to and with their children from birth “boosts their brain power and sets them up for success at school,” the Guardian reported. But that video was far from alone. There were dozens of others that demonstrated Black fathers expressing the same unconditional love for their children in a wide range of other activities. From fathers doing their daughters’ hair to sharing a dance routine with them to reading them books and otherwise just sharing special time with their children, the below videos were just the latest evidence that Black fathers are just as loving as other fathers, even though the CDC data suggests they are even more so than their counterparts from other backgrounds. 16. 30. Black dads, they will not always do whay you tell them to do but they will always do what you do pic.twitter.com/hHsuXfdxDa— Brother Tyrone X (@tyrone345345) March 6, 2019 3. Always Dope to see a Dad Doing His Daughters Hair #STRONGBLACKFATHERS…..#Blackfathersmatter #Blackfathers #BlackDads #Blackmen #Blacklove #Blackexcellence #Dads #DontforgetDads #Daddyduties #Prouddad #Dadlife #DadGoals #Daddysgirl #Daddyslittlegirl #dadsanddaughters pic.twitter.com/nUNRFhk6df— Strong Black Fathers (@SBFathers) June 10, 2019 23. #BlackFathersBeautiful trend! Shout out to all father’s who taking care of their kids. Salute!Because most of us wasn’t raised with no father in the house, doesnt mean we cant be great dads and love our kids!! This is my son and myself having fun during the snow storm! pic.twitter.com/TMoudfT2eY— Ace (@Ace_2984) March 22, 2018 8. Black fathers matter @BlackOwnedUS pic.twitter.com/iOKqcjd2Rw— TV One (@tvonetv) May 6, 2019 17. Imagine waking up, and seeing this #fatherhood #youngdads #blackfathers #daddygoals #likefatherlikeson pic.twitter.com/SxjSnReK0x— Blue Rose (@queennaija) May 13, 2019 20. Promoting our young Black fathers one post at a time! pic.twitter.com/VjSoRpELrC— EBONY MAGAZINE (@EBONYMag) August 3, 2018 9. My wife’s pregnancy has her with swollen hands, so I have to make sure things get done. #BlackFathersMatter pic.twitter.com/fgiIBU6s1Y— #TheMoneyMan (@LawrenceCainJr) January 13, 2019 Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. 25. Black fathers are giving out some #HairLove. pic.twitter.com/q2BKczKdjf— AJ+ (@ajplus) July 20, 2017 19. Just wanted to salute @Oreo for getting the narrative right and showing the love between black fathers and their sons. It’s so important and needed in the world! Shout out to @wizkhalifa and his son Sebastian. pic.twitter.com/yZY2QfyV9M— Diddy (@Diddy) February 12, 2019 14. When you’re away at work and dad sends you this why is my son so cute #blackfathers pic.twitter.com/Z8SIyarVkk— Ddh (@diamond_oh) June 11, 2019 18. Black Men do love and take care of their kids. We are great fathers and leaders.. There is a narrative going around filled with lies like We don’t support each other. Like all we do Is kill each other. That we do not love our black women. All are not True pic.twitter.com/0DSSo6OQk9— Brother Tyrone X (@tyrone345345) February 17, 2019 24. For the 1x. I love this lil girl more than anything #BlackFathers pic.twitter.com/oaz4qHovX7— B (@skreetlilb) March 22, 2018 32. BLACK DADS ARE WINNING RIGHT NOW pic.twitter.com/enzDxGKJFU— AHUS (@AmericaHatesUs) November 30, 2017 Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. 1. #ChangeTheNarrative !!! LOVE IT BRUH!!! #TeamDL #blackfathers #blackfathersmatter #love #family #fatherdaughter #Repost @niecynash1 with @get_repost・・・Help someone be great today! #rp @theblackmancan pic.twitter.com/t2pKhQ8u6p— DL Hughley (@RealDLHughley) March 29, 2019 26. C.D.C. in 2013 found that black fathers were the most involved with their children daily of other group of fathers pic.twitter.com/3nb7lJXlfg— Brother Tyrone X (@tyrone345345) July 17, 2017last_img read more

Fighting Ebola is hard In Congo fake news makes it harder

first_img © UNICEF/UN0228985/Naftalin With 600 confirmed cases and 343 deaths recorded since August 2018, the outbreak is the second largest ever after the massive epidemic that struck West Africa 5 years ago and killed more than 11,000. Conflict has smoldered for years in North Kivu, an antigovernment stronghold, and some at-risk areas are inaccessible because they are controlled by armed rebels or can’t be reached by road or rail. The outbreak has already reached several urban centers, including Butembo, a city of almost 700,000. An experimental vaccine developed by Merck and given to nearly 60,000 people so far, has likely slowed the virus’s spread but hasn’t stopped it.In West Africa, fear kept people away from clinics, meaning Ebola cases, as well as diseases such as measles and malaria, went untreated. Mistrust of governments and aid workers ran high and rumors were rife. That’s even more true in the DRC now. In September 2018, an opposition politician, Crispin Mbindule Mitono, claimed on local radio that a government lab had manufactured the Ebola virus “to exterminate the population of Beni,” a city that was one of the earliest foci of the outbreak. Another rumor has it that the Merck vaccine renders its recipients sterile. On 26 December 2018, the national electoral commission decided to exclude Beni and Butembo from the polls because of the epidemic; the following day, an Ebola evaluation center was attacked during protests. Although opposition organizations condemned the commission’s decision, they called for the Ebola response to be protected—which health workers saw as a small but significant victory. “We’ve managed to get communities to separate in their minds Ebola control from the broader political agenda,” says Michael Ryan, who directs the World Health Organization’s role in the campaign in Geneva, Switzerland. “That’s been really helpful.” Ryan hands much of the credit to social scientists working for the various agencies involved in the response. Along with community engagement workers, they make up one-third of the workforce.Part of their role is to chart the social networks through which the virus spreads, but they also gather information about communities’ perceptions, which is entered within days into an online “dashboard” created by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in Geneva. The government has also recruited young people to report misinformation circulating on WhatsApp, a major information channel in the DRC, says Jessica Ilunga, a spokesperson for the DRC’s Ministry of Health in Kinshasa.As rumors surface, communications experts rebut them with accurate information via WhatsApp or local radio. They take care not to repeat the misinformation; research has shown this is the best way to help the public “forget” false news and reinforce the truth. The vocal support of Ebola survivors has helped as well. Grateful for their care, some have become volunteers at Ebola treatment centers (ETCs).So far, the responders believe they are winning the information war. People who think they might be ill are now far more willing to accept a referral to an ETC than they might have been early on, says IFRC’s Ombretta Baggio. The CUBE, used for the first time in this outbreak, is also a big help, says Tajudeen Oyewale, UNICEF’s deputy representative in the DRC. In the past, visitors were kept at a safe distance from patients within an ETC or not permitted at all. Designed by a Senegal-based organization called ALIMA, the CUBE, with its transparent walls and external arm entries—like those in a laboratory glove box—allows patients and their relatives to see and speak to each other up close. The €15,000, reusable units also improve care, because health workers don’t need to wear cumbersome protective gear that limits their movements and can only be worn for a short time.Organized tours of the ETCs for members of the local community have helped, too, as have creches for the children of sick mothers, located close to the centers. Ambulances in North Kivu no longer use sirens when transporting suspected Ebola patients, as the sound was judged stigmatizing in West Africa.Burial practices keep evolving as well. In early Ebola epidemics, victims were often buried unceremoniously, sealed in opaque body bags, without allowing relatives and friends to say farewell. That bred resentment and stoked rumors about corpses being stolen to sell their organs. In what are called “safe and dignified” burials, introduced in the West Africa epidemic, families are given more opportunities to see and spend time with the body. For the current epidemic, responders procured transparent body bags, allowing families to see their loved one until the coffin is closed.“One of the starkest lessons we learned in West Africa is that we don’t need to change everything about a traditional burial,” says anthropologist Juliet Bedford, director of a U.K.-based consultancy called Anthrologica in Oxford. “We just need to make sure it is medically safe.” Even touching the body is sometimes allowed, provided relatives wear protective clothing.Contingency plans are in place in case of further unrest, and the partner agencies have bolstered preparedness in neighboring areas not yet touched by the epidemic. Ryan says the political problems may have an upside: “Communities that resist are energetic,” he says. “If you can turn that negative energy into positive energy, then it becomes a force for good. You just have to know how to pick that lock.” Email By Laura SpinneyJan. 14, 2019 , 3:35 PM The CUBE, a transparent biosecure tent, allows health workers to treat Ebola patients without wearing protective gear. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is providing a natural experiment in fighting fake news. Occurring in a conflict zone, amid a controversial presidential election, the epidemic has proved to be fertile ground for conspiracy theories and political manipulation, which can hamper efforts to treat patients and fight the virus’s spread. Public health workers have mounted an unprecedented effort to counter misinformation, saying the success or failure of the Ebola response may pivot on who controls the narrative.Tensions are expected to rise again in the wake of the 10 January declaration by the DRC’s election commission that opposition leader Felix Tshisekedi won the election, held on 30 December 2018. Foreign observers and the Roman Catholic Church’s monitors say Martin Fayulu, another opposition figure, garnered more votes, and his supporters are alleging fraud. Health workers know rumors thrive amid uncertainty.“I usually tell my teams that we fight two outbreaks, Ebola and fear,” says Carlos Navarro Colorado of the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) in New York City. “It is all about information.” For the first time in an Ebola outbreak, UNICEF and other agencies have joined forces as a single response team, which answers to the DRC’s Ministry of Health and includes dozens of social scientists, who use the airwaves, social media, and meetings with community and religious leaders to fight misinformation. Responders also foster trust by making their work more transparent—in some cases literally. A new biosecure tent, called the Biosecure Emergency Care Unit for Outbreaks (CUBE), allows relatives to visit and see Ebola patients during treatment. Fighting Ebola is hard. In Congo, fake news makes it harder ALIMA/Anne-Gaelle Borg Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A member of UNICEF’s Ebola outreach team addresses the public in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo.last_img read more

New Yorks Biggest Art Museum to Return a Stolen Artifact

first_imgThe Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York bought an artifact from a Parisian art dealer — a gold-sheathed coffin from the 1st century BC — for $4 million in 2017. But now the museum has announced that it is sending its prized artifact to the Egyptian government for good. Why? The coffin was stolen fairly recently, it’s been discovered. The museum’s president says they didn’t know the coffin was stolen when they bought it. The Met is cooperating fully with the District Attorney’s investigation, and Met president Daniel Weiss has said the museum is committed to figuring out “how we can help to deter future offenses against cultural property.”New York, New York – July 10, 2011: The recently renovated exterior of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Visited by millions of people each year, this world renowned museum is located on 5th avenue between 80th and 84th streets.Weiss, in the statement, also apologized to Dr. Khaled El-Enany, Egypt’s minister of antiquities. The DA obtained valid proof that the museum was given a fake ownership history for the artifact during negotiations. Investigators reportedly learned that the art dealer provided the Met with a forged 1971 Egyptian export license.The Met was so proud of the Egyptian coffin that it built an entire exhibit around it, a show that closed suddenly in mid-February 2019.Cairo, Egypt – July 20, 2016: The face of an ancient Egyptian sarcophagus in Cairo.“A highly ornamented ancient Egyptian coffin from the first century BC is the centerpiece of this exhibition. The coffin, which was inscribed for a high-ranking priest of the ram-headed god Heryshef of Herakleopolis, is displayed with seventy works from The Met collection that provide contextual information about Nedjemankh’s role as a priest in ancient Egypt, his burial, and the decoration on the coffin,” said the museum at the time the exhibit opened.The exhibition was viewed by more than 450,000 visitors before it closed.HeryshafThe details of what the French art dealer told the Met at the time of purchase are unclear. “Notwithstanding the representations that the coffin had been exported from Egypt in 1971, recent evidence suggests it was looted from Egypt in 2011,” according to the Met’s statement.This would mean the coffin most likely disappeared from the country during the Arab Spring, a period of protests beginning in December 2010 in Tunisia, which spread to numerous other Arab nations and resulted in various changes of government.Heryshaf. Photo by anonymous CC BY-SA 3.0 frThe false date given to the Met officials of 1971 is significant. Before the issuance of Antiquities Protection Law No 117 of 1983, the Egyptian law allowed the export of some artifacts.Check out a related video on the amazing accuracy of Ancient Egyptian pregnancy tests:Shaaban Abdel Gawad, supervisor general of Egypt’s Antiquities Repatriation Department, announced that investigations performed by the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office took place over 20 months.Met lobby at main entranceThe DA’s office has been focusing its efforts on recovering stolen artifacts from New York’s museums and galleries. In 2017 the office seized from the Met a 2,300-year-old vase depicting Dionysus riding in a cart pulled by a satyr. “The vase was believed to have been looted by tomb raiders in Italy in the 1970s,” reported the New York Times.A planned late February lecture on the artifact at the Met titled “Nedjemankh and His Gilded Coffin,” with sought after tickets available on a “first come first served basis,” has been canceled.Coffin of the priest Nedjemankh. Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim CC BY 2.0“Our museum must be a leader among our peers in the respect for cultural property and in the rigor and transparency of the policy and practices that we follow,” Max Hollein, the museum’s director, said in a written statement. “We will learn from this event — specifically I will be leading a review of our acquisitions program — to understand what more can be done to prevent such events in the future.”Read another story from us: How a Medieval Fortress Became the Most Famous Art Museum in the WorldThe Met also released the information that the art dealer in Paris is named Christophe Kunicki and that the Met planned to consider “all means” for the recovery of the money it had paid.last_img read more